Month: March 2017

Poverty Pimping: The Effects of Affordable Housing on Public Schools

The average family earning minimum wage spends 141 percent of their income struggling to meet basic needs – food, shelter, clothing. —Sherrod Brown Across America, there is a population of students in school districts that are labeled as the “transient population” because of their family’s mobility rate.The mobility of students from school-to-school is primarily connected to affordable housing and access to…

Arne Duncan to Trump and DeVos: We Cannot Stop Protecting Our Most Vulnerable Students

In AJC’s Get Schooled blog hosted by Maureen Downey, former Education Secretary Arne Duncan pushes back on the Trump’s administration call to leave enforcement of federal civil rights laws to states. Duncan notes that while Trump has claimed education to be “the civil rights issue of our time,” leaving it up to states to protect civil rights will not hold…

Will Proposed Atlanta School Closures Open the Door for Further Gentrification?

There’s a lot of questions and conversations about school closures in Atlanta. In order for us to address the growing concern, we must look at what we know about the correlation and connection of school closures to gentrification. I’ve talked with educators, students, parents, community residents and business owners who are concerned about how gentrification is impacting the education of black, brown and mixed…

Chance the Rapper donates one million dollars.

Chance the Rapper donated $1M to Chicago Public Schools. He Loves His City.

Since the dawn of Hip Hop existence, artists have declared their love for their hometowns. It is standard rapper protocol; you put on for your city. Their city represents their identity: the style of their wardrobes, the nuance of their language, the hardships they have endured, the animus of their art. Especially for rappers from Atlanta. Below is an infinitesimal…

profound gentlemen

Black Male Educators Need A Space To Feel Vulnerable and Empowered (And Super Black). This Is It.

Less than two percent of our nation’s educators are Black males. That includes teachers and counselors and deans and principals and paraprofessionals and special education interventionists and P.E. teachers and whatever other infinite titles that impact students in school buildings. Two percent. 2 out of 100. Literally millions of Americans have never had a Black male educator. People hear this…

It’s Really This Simple: School Districts That Empower Teachers Will See Student Success

There’s a lot of talk about how we can improve schools, from various turnaround strategies to school choice community partnership programs, but I think one of the most critical areas is the need for professional development in order to empower our teachers. In talking to several of my colleagues who are still teaching in APS traditional schools, they love the…