10 Reasons Support Staff Aren’t Supported

It is so important that we put the needs of our children first. The support of Nurses, Counselors, Graduation Coaches, Student Life Directors, Para Professionals, RTI, Gift and Talented Coordinators, Special Education Coordinators  and Family Engagement Coordinators help make this dynamic work happen. Yet, educational leaders continue to send monies and resources to other areas of focus in education that don’t have direct impact on student achievement and development.

Here are 10 Reasons Why Support Staff Aren’t Supported: 

  1. Adult needs are first
  2. Poverty makes profits
  3. Lack of effective leadership
  4. Lack of vision for student success
  5. Not effectively managing financial resources
  6. Lack of partnership development for schools
  7. No accountability
  8. Ineffective policies
  9. Lack of procedures
  10. Lack of understanding of services

In order to support staff who fill in the gap of the academic, emotional and social growth of our children we must place children first and not adults. We must realize that poverty makes profit for corporations and organizations that have financial and political ties to schools. We must build effective leaders by promoting educators with promise and purpose for serving children. The vision must be what is elevated, celebrated and promoted and not the personal agenda or success of adults. Effectively managing financial resources helps support areas that are need to build student achievement. Driving the vision requires partnership development on the school level for child and family needs. NO accountability is what has driven us to the lack of educational support for children and schools we see now. Families and stakeholders must be engaged in spite of how well schools may build relationships with them. When stakeholders aren’t present, accountability lacks. Ineffective policies are a result of the lack of accountability which also creates bad practices and procedures. The core of why support staff aren’t supported is the lack of understanding of the services and programs offered. After a while it becomes a question of if it’s truly a lack of understanding or simply a lack of care. 

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Jason has worked in education for over 15 years as a teacher, blogger and community advocate. He speaks and writes primarily about the need to improve education for Black boys, particularly increasing the number of Black male educators in schools. In addition to blogging here at EdLanta, Jason is also a featured writer at Education Post.

More Comments

%d bloggers like this: