Black Fathers and Sons Reading Is the New Norm in Atlanta!

Black boys in Atlanta are reading more because of literacy-based programs like Real Dads Read. I wrote about the organization that runs it, Fathers Incorporated, back in October.

Real Dads Read has since grown now having 71 libraries/learning centers in barber shops and schools around metro Atlanta. The initiative has distributed more than 5000 books helping to ensure Black fathers and sons are reading. 

Fathers Incorporated is now working with the Urban Child Study Center in the College of Education and Human Development at Georgia State University to evaluate program outcomes in Atlanta. A total of 40 fathers will be recruited to participate and sociolinguistic methods and surveys will be used to examine fathers’ experiences within the Real Dad Reads framework. Recruitment will begin in December.

Improving literacy skills is key to the success of Black boys in schools. Particularly those in Special Education programs. Many have deficiencies in reading. 

Studies shows that parents reading with their children impacts their language and literacy development. 

Real Dads Read is aimed at supporting elementary and middle school aged children (K-8) and their fathers/male caregivers by:

1) encouraging children to develop a love of reading,

2) improving children’s literacy skills and educational outcomes, and

3) strengthening bonds between fathers/caregivers and their children.

Real Dads Read is supported by the Anne E. Casey Foundation, Literacy For All Fund, Walton Family Foundation (AmbitiousX), United Way of Greater Atlanta, Little Free Libraries, Hachette Book Group, Atlanta Cares and Furthering Fathering.

For tips on engaging fathers, barber shops or Real Dads Read visit www.realdadsread.org, email [email protected], or call 770.804.9800.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Jason has worked in education for over 15 years as a teacher, blogger and community advocate. He speaks and writes primarily about the need to improve education for Black boys, particularly increasing the number of Black male educators in schools. In addition to blogging here at EdLanta, Jason is also a featured writer at Education Post.

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