Solving the Race Problem for Black Boys in Schools

Solving the race problem in America’s classrooms is not a simple equation.

That doesn’t make it impossible to solve!

Regardless of how it gets solved, we cannot continue to ignore the impact of racism on Black boys in schools.

The National Museum of African-American History highlights the negative impact of American stereotypes of Black citizens.

Stereotypes negatively impact Black boys beginning as early as kindergarten in schools.

Solving the Race Problem for Black Boys in Schools

Where do we begin?

One solution is taking time to understand how boys learn.

Now in focusing on Black boys, there are several things that work well from them.

For example, interactive learning environment, STEAM, leadership, service learning projects .

But there are many schools that don’t have the autonomy to think outside of the box.

If teachers were able to be innovative in teaching standards and have support, 

. . . our Black boys would be succeeding at higher rates.

Having Black male educators in and out of the classroom works!

We just simply don’t have enough as 2% of Black males are in Education.

Organizations like Profound Gentlemen here to help train and retain Black male teachers in schools.

Research shows that when children see themselves in the classroom, they perform better.

As a teacher, I see firsthand how my presence as a Black male makes a difference in how my students perform.

It most definitely has a positive impact on the Black boys.

Black male teachers are a solution to solving the race problem for Black boys in the classroom.

We change the stereotypes and the data on Black boys succeeding in school.


For more information on Solving the Race Problem contact Abdul Kelly, M. Ed. , Founder of Solving The Race Problem , [email protected]
WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Jason has worked in education for over 15 years as a teacher, blogger and community advocate. He speaks and writes primarily about the need to improve education for Black boys, particularly increasing the number of Black male educators in schools. In addition to blogging here at EdLanta, Jason is also a featured writer at Education Post.

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