Georgia Kids LevelUp To Read

Low literacy rates in Georgia have caused many children to suffer academically. Seeing the large numbers of children behind their reading grade level caused school districts in GA to think differently.

Students of color in Georgia are especially behind in literacy and math data.

Even further, the data also shows that Black boys had the highest numbers in students behind grade level.  Of course, Georgia communities responded to the data with a sense of urgency. Low literacy rates caused organizations to truly look at numbers and ask if we really believe that all kids can read in Georgia.

One organization, GeorgiaCAN, has done advocacy work around on improving literacy in Georgia schools. The organization part of 50CAN, believes in all children and wants to help parents make reading easy and fun.

GeorgiaCAN wants to encourage students to have a strong passion for reading!

This is especially important in the summer months. We have to make reading fun for students and families. The organization even surveyed Georgia teachers on what books they’d suggest for students.

Here are some of the books recommended for families this summer!

Pre-Kindergarten:
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin, Jr. and John Archambault

Kindergarten:
My Kicks: A Sneaker Story! by Susan Verde

1st Grade:
Before She Was Harriett by Lesa Cline-Ransome

2nd Grade:
The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo

3rd Grade:
The Very Last Castle by Travis Jonker

Please check out the full list here and additional resources provided by Steven Quinn, GeorgiaCAN State Outreach Manager. They have even organized the books by grade level.

I’m championing for Georgia parents to have their children read while driving, read out loud and research things that inspire them to want to read and learn more about them.

Most children don’t like to read. Especially during the summer months. EdLanta has recently written on how to inspire Black boys to read and dispelling the myth that Black boys hate to read.

Reading is fundamental and fun for all!

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Jason has worked in education for over 15 years as a teacher, blogger and community advocate. He speaks and writes primarily about the need to improve education for Black boys, particularly increasing the number of Black male educators in schools. In addition to blogging here at EdLanta, Jason is also a featured writer at Education Post.

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