Author: Jason B. Allen

Jason has worked in education for over 15 years as a teacher, blogger and community advocate. He speaks and writes primarily about the need to improve education for Black boys, particularly increasing the number of Black male educators in schools. In addition to blogging here at EdLanta, Jason is also a featured writer at Education Post.

A Note to Parents

Dear Parents, You are your child’s first teacher. Their success in school begins at home. Tell them daily they are special and that they are somebody. Let them know that reading, writing and speaking are important. As teachers, we see the urgency in this. Many people don’t see the hundreds of kids who never get a hug, hear a kind…

I Almost Quit But My Student Changed My Mind

Returning back to the classroom this year has reminded me of a teacher’s journey. Recently one of my 6th grade students wrote this narrative that changed my mind about regretting going back to teach. His story reminded me of why I came back to the classroom. I admire the bravery of one of my Black boys who recently shared a…

America’s Achievement Gap Is the Pathway to Failure

We are fighting for our Black boys and the sustainability of our education system in what seems like a losing battle. Many of them are lost in the achievement gap. So why not close it? Well it’s not that simple! The achievement gap continues to grow while more schools are being closed. As schools are being closed, more private prisons being…

There’s Still A Lot of School Turnaround Work To Do!

There’s still a lot of school turnaround work to do! But it’s not being done because parents aren’t truly engaged in this work. We always hear how schools and teachers aren’t doing enough. Well please explain to me what parents are supposed to do? Parents must be intentionally engaged in the learning process before school starts. We all play a…

Black Boys Should Be In Playgrounds Not Jail Cells

Black boys deserve playgrounds not jail cells! So where do we go wrong when  playgrounds turn into jail cells? It begins as early as third grade when the school-to-prison pipeline begins for many boys of color. Third grade is the next biggest milestone after Kindergarten. It’s during this time in a child and family’s life that they learn about the…

Sister I Have Your Back!

One of my 6th grade students inspired by Claude McKay’s, “If We Must Die”, wrote this poem, “Sister I Have Your Back!”, acknowledging the fact that girls are often overlooked in schools.   Girl, I see you! It’s hard going from class to class, feeling less than.   Constantly being overlooked because your test scores aren’t enough! You didn’t score…